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Move Over for Mooer Pedals

If you happen to be in the market for some inexpensive pedals that still deliver everything in one teeny, tiny package...first, how oddly specific of you! And second, look no further than here at the shop! We are now the proud dealers for Mooer electronics; more specifically, their awesome little line of compact pedals. I've spent the last week going through our stock and testing each pedal and I'm here to shamelessly plug a few them this week here on the blog. How salesy of me. 

Let's take a look at some of them, shall we?

Mooer Compact PureBoost ($89.99):

There are a lot of boost pedals out there, and frankly I've managed to play a couple of really terrible ones that sucked out my tone and my headroom and only left me with some loud, thin bones of whatever sound I had in the first place. Most people approach boost pedals with a general sense of "you get what you pay for", and for the most part, I tend to agree. Nicer components in the circuitry don't necessarily guarantee "better sound", but for the most part money can make a difference. Then the Mooer micro pedals show up and I have to say that this is a great example of "bigger (and more expensive) isn't always better." For the nice, affordable price of ninety clams, you get a clean, clear, nominally "pure" boost that doesn't vampirically suck the tone out of our guitar. The clean stays clean and the dirty stays dirty, which makes this pedal comparable to its more expensive counterparts. Also gives your distorted tone a healthy plumping in the midrange when boosted which is extremely handy for beefing up an overdriven single-coil guitar like a strat or tele when you need that extra MMMPH! And the best part (as with the rest of these pedals), this thing is exquisitely small. A very handy feature when assembling your on-the-go pedal arsenal. 

Specs include: 20db+ clean boost with ±15db 2 band EQ, full metal shell, true bypass circuitry, runs on 9V DC.

 

Mooer Compact AnaEcho ($99.99): 

Whether they remain one of your trusty workhorse tools for your style, or if you're like me and you just like exploring the sonic landscapes of your mind (maaannn...), delay pedals can be a lot of fun and open you up to a lot of new, creative ways to use your guitar. A good delay pedal can do this without, again, sucking out your tone and just leaving you with a sterile set of effects. This little guy preserves your tone and multiplies it like a beautiful, sonic amoeba into infinity...(man, what am I on?) This is also a great example of a simple delay interface where you are given all sorts of control without overthinking it. It's a very intuitive way to dive into delay effects and dial in your patterns and it's a fun little toy to compliment the rest of your pedal board. 

Specs include: full analog circuitry for a warm, smooth delay, full metal shell, true bypass circuitry, runs on 9V DC.

 

Mooer Compact Mod Factory ($99.99):

Don't let the tiny-ness of this pedal fool you because inside this thing is one heck of an effects extravaganza. Pretty much everything from the moderately odd to the just plain weird to the almost occult is in this pedal just waiting to be in some sort of Primus or Frank Zappa cover band. Boasting 11 different kinds of modulation effects in one, this pedal is a surprisingly uncomplicated approach to some of guitar's more complicated and nuanced sounds. There's actually a handy chart printed on the sides of the shell to show what does what and how to get this or that sound, which is great if you're a dumb drummer pretending to play guitar like myself. Hey, if it doesn't do what you want the first time, just hit it harder, right? But I digress...basically, the Mod Factory gives you the advantage of having eleven different pedals all in one sexy, compact stomper. 

Specs include: 32-bit high performance DSP chip, making all tones comparable with their higher-end counterparts, full metal shell, true bypass circuitry, runs on 9V DC.

 

Mooer Compact ShimVerb ($99.99):

This guy is actually one of the coolest reverb pedals I've ever played with, partly because of the punch it packs at its size and price point, but also because it offers three different types of reverb to choose from depending on your environement, style, and application. Room Reverb gives you your classic spacial-spectrum from a small room to a concert hall sound which is normally all one would ever need for bread-n-butter rock, blues, what have you music. Spring Reverb is also a neat little feature that authentically emulates a classic, vintage 60's surf-style reverb tone. But for the sound-explorers, innovators, and shoegazers out there, Shimmer Reverb is a great little effect that layers on ambient overtones to your sound giving you everything from haunting and beautiful to down-right spooky. Definitely inspires the creative side of guitar and gives you quite a bit of a reverb without robbing your wallet or over-coloring your tone.

Specs include: 3 Different Reverb effects, full metal shell, true bypass circuitry, runs on 9V DC. 

 

 Mooer Compact Ninety Orange ($89.99):

Call me kitschy, but I love me a good phase pedal. And up until I found this guy, I would have said that MXR's ever-popular Phase 90 was the way to go as far a affordability and sound. But though I wouldn't say they're one in the same, Mooer's take on the classic phaser effect is actually pretty nifty! Tone-wise and useablity-wise, the thing is almost exactly a Phase 90 but with one little added feature at the top. A simple flick of that little switch will give you two different types of tone, affording you that much more sound for the pedal. Vintage and Modern tone modes will color your sound in a either a warmer or brighter way and give you either a slightly softer or slightly more immediate attack with the phase effect itself. Kind of cool, right? I would say it's definitely worth a comparison with the MXR counterpart. 

Specs include: full analog circuitry, 2 different phasing tones, full metal shell, true bypass circuitry, runs on 9V DC. 

 

So, if I had to sum up these pedals in a few adjectives I'd say they're great for the following: small, affordable, and pretty dern good soundin'. If you're looking to embellish your effects repetoire, or if you're just bored and want to kill some time, I'd recommend taking a few a these toys for a spin and seeing how you like 'em. I'm starting to think I do. 

 

Stay excellent and have a good week!

 


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